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Document Type:

printed book

Language:

Latin

Place:

Italy

Special Features:

printed marginalia

Related Content

The Arcadian Library..
Commentary

Serapionis medici arabis celeberrimi practica stvdiosis medicinae vtilissima: quam postremo Andreas Alpagus Bellunensis medicus, & philosophus, idiomatis arabici peritissimus, in latinum conuertit, cujus translatio nunc primum exit in lucem, Eiusdem Serapionis de simplicium medicamentorum temperamentis commētaria Abrahamo Iudæo, & Simone Ianuensi interpretibus, quæ diligenti cura nunc sunt castigata, ac singulis eorum capitibus dioscoridis, ac Galeni loca, in quibus de eodem medicamento ab illis auctoribus agitur, in margine notata sunt, omnium præterea capitum indicem, ac simplicium medicamentorum nomina tam Arabica, quam Latina impressimus.

Serapionis medici arabis celeberrimi practica stvdiosis medicinae vtilissima: quam postremo Andreas Alpagus Bellunensis medicus, & philosophus, idiomatis arabici peritissimus, in latinum conuertit, cujus translatio nunc primum exit in lucem, Eiusdem Serapionis de simplicium medicamentorum temperamentis commētaria Abrahamo Iudæo, & Simone Ianuensi interpretibus, quæ diligenti cura nunc sunt castigata, ac singulis eorum capitibus dioscoridis, ac Galeni loca, in quibus de eodem medicamento ab illis auctoribus agitur, in margine notata sunt, omnium præterea capitum indicem, ac simplicium medicamentorum nomina tam Arabica, quam Latina impressimus.
  • Author(s):
    Yúhānnā Ibn Serapion, active 9th century; Serapio, Iunior
    Yúhānnā Ibn Serapion, active 9th century; Serapio, Iunior
  • Date:
    1550
  • Place:
    Venetiis
  • Keywords:
    10th century, Classical medicine, Early Modern Period, Europe, Health, Herbalism, History of medicine, Illness, Medieval medicine, Padua, Physician, Renaissance Medicine
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Serapion (Yahya ibn-Sarafyun), called "Serapion the Elder," of the second half of the ninth century, was a Christian physician who wrote two medical compilations in Syriac. One of these was translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona as Practica sive breviarium before 1187. A second Serapion, called "Serapion the Younger," possibly a Christian, wrote in Arabic (although no Arabic copy of his text survives). His treatise, translated into Latin as Liber de simplici medicina (The Book of Simple Medicine) or Liber aggregatus (The Aggregate of Medicine), was derived from Byzantine and Muslim sources and enjoyed much popularity. The Venetian volume contains both Andrea Alpagus' Latin translation of the "Practica," and "Liber de simplici medicina," in the Medieval translation by Simon of Genoa and Abraham Judæus Tortuosensis. Andrea Alpago (145?-1521), physician at the University of Padua, spent approximately twenty years at the Venetian Consulate in Damascus (1487-1507). He is the author of a new revised translation of Avicenna's "Canon" and other Arabic works. Abraham Judæus, a medical writer, was born in the middle of the thirteenth century, probably at Marseilles, where his father, Shem-Ṭob ben Isaac of Tortosa, practised medicine. He is author of a medical handbook. He studied probably in Italy, as the last chapter of his handbook shows the influence of the Italian physician Gentile. Abraham ben Shem-Ṭob assisted in the translation of "Serapion de Simplicibus" (printed in 1473), and also translated chapter twenty-eight of the "Liber Practicæ," under the special title "Liber Servitoris." It treats of the preparation of simple medicaments. The Hebrew translation is lost, but the Latin version still exists under the title "Liber Servitoris XXVIII. de Præparatione Medicinarum Simplicium, translatus a Simone Januensi, interprete Abrahamo Judæo," Venice, 1471. Abraham was the actual translator and Simon merely added his name.

  • Author(s):
    Yúhānnā Ibn Serapion, active 9th century; Serapio, Iunior
    Yúhānnā Ibn Serapion, active 9th century; Serapio, Iunior
  • Date:
    1550
  • Place:
    Venetiis
  • Keywords:
    10th century, Classical medicine, Early Modern Period, Europe, Health, Herbalism, History of medicine, Illness, Medieval medicine, Padua, Physician, Renaissance Medicine
  • Edition:
    First edition of Alpago's translation
  • Language:
    Latin
  • Content type:
    Single-volume work