Arcadian Library Online-Albumasar de magnis coniunctionibus, annorum reuolutionibus, ac eorum
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Subjects

Document Type:

incunable

Language:

Latin

Period:

1400–1499

Place:

Germany

Special Features:

illustration, marginalia

Related Content

Albumasar de magnis coniunctionibus, annorum reuolutionibus, ac eorum profectionibus, octo continens tractatus.

Albumasar de magnis coniunctionibus, annorum reuolutionibus, ac eorum profectionibus, octo continens tractatus.
  • Shelfmark:
    15:02
  • DOI:
    10.24157/ARC_8089.FC
  • Printer / Publisher:
    [Erhard Ratdolt]
  • Author(s):
    Abū Maʻshar, -886
    Abū Maʻshar, -886
  • Alternative Author(s):
    Abū Maʻšar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Albumasar, -886; Albumazar, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad Balkhī, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad al-Balkhī, -886; أبو مشعر, -886; أبو معشر, -886; أبومعشر, -886; ابو معشر, -886
    Abū Maʻšar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Albumasar, -886; Albumazar, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad Balkhī, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad al-Balkhī, -886; أبو مشعر, -886; أبو معشر, -886; أبومعشر, -886; ابو معشر, -886
  • Date:
    1489
  • Place:
    [Augsburg]
  • Keywords:
    Astrology, Astronomy, Augsburg, Venice, Zodiac
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First edition of the famous astrologer Abū Ma‘shar's (Albumasar, c. 787–886) De magnis coniunctionibus, translated into Latin probably by John of Seville. The Arabic original was known by titles including Kitāb fi duwal wa-al-milal (Book on Dynasties and Religions) and Kitāb al-qirānāt (Book of Conjunctions). This elaborate astrological interpretation of history, of Sassanian (Zoroastrian) origin, reached Abū Ma‘shar through the works of Māshā’allāh, al-Ṭabarī and al-Kindī. The book suggests that ever-changing planetary influences mean no human institution – be that religion or kingly power – can hold a permanent state. The book is in eight chapters: on the appearance of prophets and their laws, the rise and fall of dynasties and kings, the effects of planetary combinations, the effect of each zodiacal sign's being in the ascendant, the lordships of the planets, transits, each zodiacal sign as muntaha and as ascendant of the revolution of the year, and the revolution of the years. There are also significant passages on comets that influenced medieval Western writers.

  • Shelfmark:
    15:02
  • DOI:
    10.24157/ARC_8089.FC
  • Printer / Publisher:
    [Erhard Ratdolt]
  • Author(s):
    Abū Maʻshar, -886
    Abū Maʻshar, -886
  • Alternative Author(s):
    Abū Maʻšar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Albumasar, -886; Albumazar, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad Balkhī, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad al-Balkhī, -886; أبو مشعر, -886; أبو معشر, -886; أبومعشر, -886; ابو معشر, -886
    Abū Maʻšar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Abū Maʻshar, -886; Albumasar, -886; Albumazar, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad Balkhī, -886; Jaʻfar ibn Muḥammad al-Balkhī, -886; أبو مشعر, -886; أبو معشر, -886; أبومعشر, -886; ابو معشر, -886
  • Date:
    1489
  • Place:
    [Augsburg]
  • Keywords:
    Astrology, Astronomy, Augsburg, Venice, Zodiac
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Short Title:
    De magnis coniunctionibus. Ed: Johannes Angelus Trad: Johannes Hispalensis
  • LOC Subject Headings:
    Astronomy, Arab; Astronomy
  • Bibliographic References:
    HC 611*; BMC II, 383; GW 836; Goff A360; Klebs 39.1; Stillwell, Awakening Interest in Science 9.
  • Language:
    Latin
  • Editor:
    Johannes Angelus, 1463-1512
  • Editor:
    Johannes Engel, 1463-1512
  • Translator:
    Joannes Hispalensis, active 12th century
  • Content type:
    Single-volume work
  • Identifier:
    ARC_8089.FC
  • Volumes:
    1
  • Format:
    Quarto
  • Collation:
    235 unnumbered pages: illustrations, diagrams
  • Additional Information:
    The editor, Johannes Angelus (Johannes Engel, c.1463–1512), was a pupil of Regiomontanus. He produced a long series of almanacs and prognostications, and a treatise on the astrolabe, published by Ratdolt in 1488. Erhard Ratdolt is one of the most famous of the early printers. A native of Augsburg, he went to Venice in 1475 and set up a printing partnership with two compatriots. They produced a series of beautiful books, including the most celebrated book associated with Ratdolt's name – the first edition of Euclid in 1482. In 1486 the partnership dissolved and Ratdolt returned to Augsburg, where he died in 1516. He made several important innovations in typography, among them the inclusion of mathematical diagrams in the text. His output is notable for a number of mathematical, astronomical and astrological works, and in particular, works by Arabic authors: first editions of Albohazen (Venice, 1485), three works of Albumasar, and two printings of (though not the first edition of) the Liber isagogicus of Alcabitius.  Further reading [1] Gracia, Jorge J. E. & Noone, T. B. (eds), 2005. A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. [2] Lemay, R. J., 1962. Abu Ma'shar and Latin Aristotelianism in the Twelfth Century. The recovery of Aristotle's natural philosophy through Arabic astrology. Beirut: American University.